The flood of hundreds of feet scratching the pavement was drowned out every few seconds by passionate roars.

“We demand change” and “Black lives matter” were just a couple of the frequent, pleading cries from the crowd.

While protesters screamed, sweat dripped down their faces as they marched through downtown Casper this afternoon in objection to George Floyd’s alleged murder by officer Derek Chauvin last week in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The crowd stomped from the David Street Station a few blocks to the Hall of Justice and city hall, where several speakers shared experiences of racial discrimination and police injustice.

While rumors on social media claimed the protest would move from Casper to Glenrock followed by Douglas, the gossip proved to be false.

This didn’t mean Converse County residents sat out of the protest though, as several locals marched for the cause.

Billie Ferris, a Douglas native, marched with a sign painted with bloody handprints.

“It’s important to gather and provide solidarity to those who need it,” she said. “The Black Lives Matter movement really needs it.”

Unlike protests in several U.S. cities that ended in riots and looting, the Casper protest stayed peaceful, with Casper Police Department officers waving to protestors.

“It’s important to peacefully protest to make sure the message we want to convey is getting across. Violence isn’t going to be the overwhelming factor of a protest,” Ferris said.

Full coverage and photos of the event will be in the June 10 issue of the Budget.

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