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Public notices are not controversial things. The public values them, according to nearly every poll taken across the country. The notices run in newspapers because they provide you, the public, valuable information about what your government is doing with your tax dollars.

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Former Sen. Al Simpson once was quote as saying that “everything in Wyoming is political, except politics. And that’s personal.” He said that a long time ago, and probably stole it from someone else to start with, but we doubt he would have realized the timelessness of his words given the cu…

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Every once in a while, we get asked why we would dare run this letter or that letter, or why we run a political cartoon about which some may disagree or find truly offensive. The answer isn’t necessarily simple, but the concept behind our decisions is simple. It’s called freedom of expressio…

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Memorial Hospital of Converse County has partnered with Western Medical Associates for years in very limited respects, as it had for several decades with Wyoming Medical Center – the publicly owned, quasi-privately run hospital in Natrona County and many other medical institutions.

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As if things weren’t hard enough for Wyoming’s small businesses, news comes that the Trump administration plans to claw back a chunk of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funds legitimate businesses have used as a lifeline to keep their employees on the payroll.

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V ery few things in American life these days enjoy the broad, cross-party and cross-ideology support as the U.S. Post Office. Enshrined as the only government agency specifically mentioned in the U.S. Constitution, the Postal Service has had its own share of woes and headaches – financial an…

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The coronavirus pandemic has laid much of the American economy on its back — but a bright spot has made the disaster less crippling than it might have been. That is the Paycheck Protection Program, which funneled money back to workers through small businesses.

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The Wyoming legislature may be taking up the anti-Republican position of raising taxes to fund state government this year, while the city of Douglas has suggested a quarter-cent sales tax to fund economic development work in all its variations. While we certainly can understand the desire to…

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Gov. Mark Gordon was right not to jump on the “lock down the state” bandwagon that was closing down the economy across the country in March, and instead proceed with smaller, less draconian measures as the data for our state became available. He is also right not to jump on the bandwagon now…

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The all-important Wyoming State Fair released it’s new master plan a week ago, and we’ve been pouring over it trying to decipher real possibilities from pipe dreams. Master plans, especially government-funded ones, tend to ignore the real costs of doing a project – like the political realiti…

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Robert Short, the 6’5” Converse County commissioner who hails originally from Glenrock but lives in Douglas, announced this week he is running for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate to replace the wildly popular Mike Enzi. Jumping into the race which could feature some high-spending c…

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The 2018 Wyoming State Fair will be only four days long, half of the eight days it has been for more than two decades. That agonizing decision was made by the Wyoming Department of Agriculture and state fair leaders based on available revenue in the current budget after severe funding cuts w…

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We hear this mantra every time the economy in Wyoming dips into the bust cycle: It’s time to diversify our economy. Then, when energy prices are on the rise and drilling hits a fevered pitch once again, we fall into the old trap of worrying about the moment and forgetting about the future. W…

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People like to say that sports is just a game. Clearly those same folks have not spent any amount of time watching the Douglas Bearcats this season.

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As they do every year, the Converse County Commissioners recently split up state grant money – about $1.5 million in total – among the county, City of Douglas and towns of Glenrock, Rolling Hills and Lost Springs. This year, however, the Town of Glenrock was absent from the meeting . . . and…